Midwest

The Midwest Region is comprised of six states with more than 30 laboratories and over 150 facilities that conduct federal research and development in a wide range of topics. From the examination of the smallest particles in the universe to the development of new engine lubricants to alternative manufacturing processes, each facility in the Midwest Region is involved in expanding the bounds of knowledge and our nation's technical capabilities.

The FLC Midwest Region's mission is to link government scientists with each other and with appropriate commercial, industrial, and academic partners so technologies developed in federal laboratories may be widely disseminated throughout the region, the nation, and the world. It accomplishes this mission through outreach at conferences and visits to the laboratories; Midwest Region email, website, and social media communication; the publication of informational brochures and a quarterly newsletter; and the development of training materials for three distinct groups of people: private-sector partners, government scientists, and technology transfer professionals.

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What Is the FLC?

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What Is Technology Transfer?

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How Can I Work With a Federal Laboratory?

Latest News

AFRL-Dr.McIntireDoorDemonstration

Dr. John McIntire, team lead and research psychologist in the Air Force Research Laboratory’s 711th Human Performance Wing, demonstrates how to use one of the portable door locks his team developed. The team has been selected for a 2019 Defense Innovation Award. (U.S. Air Force photo by Richard Eldridge)

(Photo credit: Argonne National Laboratory)

Success Stories

At the National Center for Agricultural Utilization Research, ARS chemist George Fanta (left) and Don Fisk, president of Uni-Star, Inc., examine foam packing material extruded from biodegradable cornstarch. (Photo credit: Keith Weller/USDA)

Full-scale treatment system for oxidizing ammonia in drinking water. (Photo credit: Darren Lytle, USEPA)

NASA experiments in plant growth for long-duration space flights led to the identification and manufacturing method for a nutritional supplement now found in everyday foods and infant formula.