Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL)

Agency/Department

FLC Region

Security Lab

Yes

Address

Bldg. 460
P.O. Box 5000
Upton, NY 11973-5000
United States

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Laboratory Representative

Description

One of ten national laboratories overseen and primarily funded by the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Brookhaven National Laboratory conducts research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, as well as in energy technologies and national security. Brookhaven Lab also builds and operates major scientific facilities available to university, industry and government researchers. Established in 1947 on Long Island, Upton, N.Y., Brookhaven is a multi- program national laboratory operated by Brookhaven Science Associates for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Six Nobel Prizes have been awarded for discoveries made at the Lab. Brookhaven has a staff of approximately 3,000 scientists, engineers, technicians and support staff and over 4,000 guest researchers annually. Brookhaven National Laboratory's role for the DOE is to produce excellent science and advanced technology with the cooperation, support, and appropriate involvement of our scientific and local communities.

Mission

The fundamental elements of the Laboratory's role in support of the four DOE strategic missions are the following:

  • To conceive, design, construct, and operate complex, leading edge, user-oriented facilities in response to the needs of the DOE and the international community of users.
  • To carry out basic and applied research in long-term, high-risk programs at the frontier of science.
  • To develop advanced technologies that address national needs and to transfer them to other organizations and to the commercial sector.
  • To disseminate technical knowledge, to educate new generations of scientists and engineers, to maintain technical capabilities in the nation's workforce, and to encourage scientific awareness in the general public.

Technology Disciplines

Technologies
Displaying 1 - 10 of 146
 
12-31: Nanowires
3-D TRENCH ELECTRODE DETECTORS
3D-TRENCH ELECTRODE DETECTORS
APPARATUS AND METHOD FOR BIOLOGICAL PURIFICATION OF WASTES
ATMOSPHERIC RADAR
BNL 14-21: X-Ray Crystallography Growth Plates
BSA 00-22: Assaying Clustered DNA Damages
BSA 00-28: Synthesis of YBCO Superconductors Using Low-Pressure Processing
BSA 01-07: Carbon Monoxide Tolerant Fuel Cell Electrocatalyst
BSA 01-10: Halogenated Carboranyl Porphyrins for Imageable Tumor-Targeting Agents for Radiation Therapy

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Facilities
Displaying 1 - 10 of 27
Advanced Optical Spectroscopy and Microscopy
Accelerator Center for Energy Research (ACER)
Accelerator Test Facility
Accelerator Test Facility (ATF)
Advanced UV and X-ray Probes
ATLAS
Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research (ARM)
Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer
Center for Functional Nanomaterials
Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN)

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Equipment

No Equipment

Programs

No Programs

Funds
Goal

High school science teachers frequently say that students learn science best in the laboratory, recreating the experiments that defined modern scientific knowledge and conducting new, original research. Unfortunately, many of the most interesting experiments require equipment that is simply too costly to provide in a classroom laboratory, with price tags that can reach into the millions of dollars.

The goal of the InSynC program is to enable high school teachers and students to gain remote access to experimenting with synchrotron beamtime through a competitive, peer-reviewed proposal process. The program will train both teachers and students to formulate a hypothesis-driven scientific problem and learn the skills of writing a competitive beamtime proposal. It will broaden the scientific research community at the National Synchrotron Light Source and introduce synchrotron science into the high school curriculum. This program will start with local Long Island high schools, but we anticipate that it could be expanded to a nationwide competition and involve all US synchrotrons.

Implementation

Teacher training: Teachers interested in participating in this program first take part in an intensive, 3-day synchrotron training program at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The course involves an introduction to synchrotrons and techniques, hands-on experiments, tours, and proposal-writing sessions. The course is offered 3 times per year and teachers will receive continuing education credit for participating.

Beamtime Proposals: Teachers and students formulate a hypothesis and set of experiments using conventional and synchrotron-based methods. A beamtime proposal will be written and submitted online. An NSLS Proposal Review Panel (PRP) reviews and scores the proposals. The PRP consists of a mix of synchrotron scientists and science educators, and ratings are based on scientific merit and the educational nature of the project. The highest rated proposals are allocated beamtime. If teachers wish to continue the experiments, a continuation proposal can be submitted.

Beamlines and beamtime: Approximately 2-3 days of beamtime per cycle are allocated at 3 beamlines for InSynC proposals. Specifically, beamlines equipped for remote access capabilities are used, including U2B (infrared microscopy), X26A (x-ray fluorescence microscopy), and X6A (protein crystallography). As additional beamlines are outfitted, more beamlines will be made available.

Areas of research: InSynC proposals are accepted in all areas of scientific research. However, the need for synchrotron technique(s) should be emphasized and an appropriate beamline must be available. Based on the initial suite of beamlines available for this program, experiments in earth and environmental sciences, bioenergy, biomedical imaging, and structural biology are encouraged. In addition, engineering proposals involving the development of robotics for beamline operations will also be considered.

SPSI is a three week enrichment program to students who are members of an under-represented minority (African ancestry, Hispanic/Latino, Native American, or Pacific Islander) sciences.

Approximately 20 students are selected to participate.

The program consists of three one-week modules of instruction to include topics in physics, biology, chemistry, and environmental science.

Experienced educators engage the STEM-Prep Summer Institute participants in hands-on activities relating to the different types of research conducted at BNL.

**SPSI is a commuter program, transportation to and from BNL is not provided**

Audience for This Program

Ninth grade students from underrepresented minorities in science.

Rules & Eligibility Criteria

  1. Students should have demonstrated ability and/or potential in science-oriented studies and activities.
  2. Students are currently enrolled in the ninth grade.
  3. Student must be present and available from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. for the during the three weeks of the program.
  4. Student must have reliable transportation to and from the Laboratory.
  5. Selected students will be ask to interview before final acceptance decisions are made

Only high schools in Suffolk County, Nassau County and Inner City Outreach schools are invited to submit nominees for participation.

Gaining Research Experience in the Environment

MISSION: To promote teaching, learning and research in all aspects of the environment for students from kindergarten through graduate school.

The G.R.E.En. Institute is located at Brookhaven National Laboratory and is run through the Office of Educational Programs.

In January 2006, the Office of Educational Programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory launched the Open Space Stewardship Program (OSSP) as part of its GREEN Institute. GREEN stands for "Gaining Research Experience in the Environment." The program fosters partnerships between schools and land stewards in their local communities. Students in grades K through 12 participate in environmental research on undeveloped land owned by either a public or private agency.

The Alliance for Graduate Education and the Professoriate - Transformation (AGEP-T) Frontiers of Research and Academic Models of Excellence of Research and Academic Models of Excellence (FRAME) capitalizes on the rigor and research accomplishments at SBU and BNL. This in turn builds an equally productive, broader partnership aimed at helping Underrepresented Minority (URM) graduate students and postdocs who are U.S. citizens, develop the essential skills for success in intensive academic environments. The long term goal is to create a competitive and diverse pool of enthusiastic, ambitious and creative educators and researchers with the capacity to be leaders in academia and industry.

AGEP-Tis a new National Science Foundation Program committed to increasing diversity in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) fields by building strategic alliances of institutions and organizations to develop programs to increase the success of underrepresented minorities in STEM.

Candidates will be selected based on eligibility, program expectations, and research proposals. Overriding consideration, when evaluating the application, will be the quality of the candidate. Successful candidates will serve a two-year term. The AGEP-T FRAME includes a competitive salary rate, additional funding for conferences/presentations, competitive benefits package, and relocation at the discretion of each department.

Program Expectations

Successful applicants will meet the same legal requirements required of all BNL employees. Papers published as a result of research conducted at BNL must comply with BNL publication procedures and require submission for legal review and approval. Additional expectations for the fellowship program include:

  • Proposed research scheduled to meet the laboratory's overall research needs
  • Participation on an education component for academic integration or mentoring
  • Annual performance evaluation progress reports
  • Mid-term evaluation/research expectations by mentor and program manager/coordinator
  • Final report due at fellowship conclusion to include: an abstract of the research conducted and copies of publications resulting from the research.

High School Research Program (HSRP) is a highly competitive, six week educational program where student work alongside Brookhaven National Laboratory scientific staff. Students who are invited to participate in the program will received an BNL guest appointment and must complete required training prior to the start date. Due to BNL safety regulations, students under the age of 18 may not be allowed to perform certain tasks.

HSRP is a commuter program, transportation to and from BNL is not provided. BNL does not provided housing for participants.

Audience for This Program

Students must have completed 11th or 12th grade and be at least 16 years old at the start of the program. Students with an interest in Chemistry must be 17 years old at the start of the program.

Rules & Eligibility Criteria

Rules and Eligibility criteria:

  1. Student must be available for the six weeks, Monday to Friday 8:30 to 5:00 p.m.
  2. Transportation and housing is not provided.
  3. Students must be a US citizen or Permanent Resident Alien (PRA)
  4. Student must be at least 16 year old at the start of the program and completed 11th or 12th grade.

Application Process

Follow the link below to apply. Be sure to have the following information at hand before starting the application process. Incomplete applications are not saved.

Application will open late December.


  • Names and contact information of references.
  • Copy of the school transcript.
  • Completed essay
  • School contact information
  • Parent and emergency contact information.

The United States Department of Energy (DOE), in accordance with its responsibility to encourage research and development in the energy area, awards grants of used energy-related laboratory equipment.

The United States Department of Energy (DOE), in accordance with its responsibility to encourage research and development in the energy area, awards grants of used energy-related laboratory equipment.

SPSI is a three week enrichment program to students who are members of an under-represented minority (African ancestry, Hispanic/Latino, Native American, or Pacific Islander) sciences.

Approximately 20 students are selected to participate.

The program consists of three one-week modules of instruction to include topics in physics, biology, chemistry, and environmental science.

Experienced educators engage the STEM-Prep Summer Institute participants in hands-on activities relating to the different types of research conducted at BNL.

**SPSI is a commuter program, transportation to and from BNL is not provided.**

Audience for This Program

Ninth Grade Under-represented minority in sciences.

Rules & Eligibility Criteria

  1. Students should have demonstrated ability and/or potential in science-oriented studies and activities.
  2. Students are currently enrolled in the ninth grade.
  3. Student must be present and available from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. for the during the three weeks of the program.
  4. Student must have reliable transportation to and from the Laboratory.
  5. Selected students will be ask to interview before final acceptance decisions are made.

Only high schools in Suffolk County, Nassau County and Inner City Outreach schools are invited to submit nominees for participation.

Application Process

Students, see your school guidance counselor, science teacher or STEP coordinator for an application.

Guidance Counselors, teachers and administrators, if you have not received an email with the application information,and would like to, please email a request to Aleida Perez at pereza@bnl.gov

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Publications

No Publications

Successes

Sulfur concrete was developed more than thirty years ago by the United States Bureau of Mines. Sulfur concrete is made by mixing sulfur, an inexpensive waste by-product of the petrochemical industry with dicyclopentadiene (DCPD), a fairly expensive organic modifier, with limited availability. This has kept the cost of sulfur concrete high and therefore, sulfur concrete has not been widely used. Dr. Paul Kalb of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) together with partners from Kazakhstan, have devised an alternative concrete composition and method for making it through a process known as Stabilized Sulfur Binder using Activated Fillers (SSBAF).

The SSBAF method uses an organic component waste by-product from the petrochemical industry, mixed with and coated on filler, such as sand, before being energetically mixed with sulfur. Dr. Kalb explained that this “green” process recycles industrial byproducts and, unlike the process for making conventional concrete, does not produce carbon dioxide. This improved sulfur concrete is less expensive than conventional SPCs, requires no water, and is highly resistant to corrosive environments. This sulfur concrete can be used in a number of applications including precast concrete products such as pipes, tanks, containers, blocks and slabs.

In 2012, Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC. (“BSA”), contractor/operator of BNL entered into an Option Agreement with Green Sulfcrete, a Long Island NY based company that was formed to commercialize the BNL’s sulfur concrete technology. Green Sulfcrete was granted an option under the DOE Startup America program. The option was granted for the company to make, use and sell sulfur concrete made by the BNL process in certain territories. Recently the company changed its name from Green Sulfcrete to Sulfcrete and has entered into a license agreement with BSA. The company was awarded the Phase I SBIR NSF grant. Under sponsored research agreements, the company continues to collaborate with BNL to develop the product further. The company anticipates entering the market with a product in 2016. The website of the company can be found at: http://www.synchropet.com/Home.aspx.

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Brookhaven National Laboratory executed a pre-commercial license with N.E. Chemcat Corporation, Japan’s leading catalyst and precious metal compound manufacturer, for electrocatalysts that can reduce the use of costly platinum and increase the effectiveness of fuel cells for use in electric vehicles. The license also includes access to innovative methods for making the catalysts and an apparatus used to manufacture them. The pre-commercial license allowed market and technical development to proceed in parallel.

Platinum is the most efficient electrocatalyst for fuel cell reactions, but platinum-based catalysts are expensive, unstable, and short-lived. The newly licensed electrocatalysts have high activity, stability, and durability, while containing only about one-tenth the platinum of conventional catalysts used in fuel cells, reducing overall costs.

The electrocatalysts consist of a palladium or a palladium alloy nanoparticle core covered with a monolayer— one-atom thick—platinum shell. This palladium-platinum combination notably improves the rate of oxygen reduction at the cathode of a hydrogen/oxygen fuel cell. This type of fuel cell produces electricity using hydrogen as fuel, and forms water as the only byproduct.

Radoslav Adzic, the Brookhaven senior chemist who led the team that developed the catalysts, said, “We are delighted that N.E. Chemcat Corporation has licensed our platinum monolayer electrocatalyst technology. We hope that it will facilitate the development of affordable and reliable fuel cell electric vehicles, which would be very beneficial for the environment since they produce no harmful emissions. Also, the use of nonrenewable fossil fuels for transportation that contribute to global warming would be greatly reduced, prolonging their availability for other uses in the future.”

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science and its Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy funded research that contributed to these technologies. In addition to Adzic, those who contributed to the research include Brookhaven chemists Jia Wang, Kotaro Sasaki, and Miomir Vukmirovic, and postdoctoral fellows Junliang Zhang and Yibo Mo.

Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a major diagnostic imaging tool used predominantly in clinical oncology for staging various cancers, assessing treatment strategies, and monitoring the effects of therapies. Emerging new diagnostic radiopharmaceutical agents that have applications in cardiology and neurology will further expand the use of PET.

A team of scientists from the medical, instrumentation and physics departments at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) have developed a compact modular PET detector. The technology is covered by four United States patents. The initial invention, named RatCAP (Rat Conscious Animal PET), allows the simultaneous study of neurochemistry and conscious movement. This high-tech, wearable PET scanner that monitor brain chemistry enables correlation of the brain’s chemical information with the awake animal’s activity. David Schlyer, one of the scientists who led the project said “The measurement of chemical messengers in the brain is important to understanding many different diseases and conditions such as drug addiction and movement disorders like Parkinson’s disease.”

The team has applied the same compact modular PET technology to produce PET scanners for various important preclinical and clinical imaging applications. The preclinical applications include PET insert for small animal research magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems that allows dual PET –MRI imaging. The clinical applications include the compact wrist PET scanner, a non-invasive tool to determine the arterial input function required in bringing quantitative PET to the bedside and the breast PET insert for breast MRI systems that facilitate functional evaluation of detected lesions to reduce the unnecessary biopsies of false positives.

SynchroPET, a Long Island, NY based startup company, entered into an option agreement with Brookhaven Science Associates (BSA) the contractor/operator of BNL to commercialize the technology. SynchroPET was the first BNL start- up that was formed under the DOE Startup America program. Recently, BSA has entered into a commercial license agreement with SynchroPET. The company anticipates entering the market with a product in 2016. SynchroPET’s website can be found at: http://www.synchropet.com.

The initial RatCAP technology was developed with funding from the DOE Office of Science

BNL PET

Brookhaven National Laboratory has a long history of working with radioisotopes for medical applications. One radionuclide in particular, Tin-117m (117mSn), has unique properties permitting its dual use for imaging and for treatment of various medical conditions. Its first application was as a palliative treatment of bone pain resulting from cancer metastases. For various reasons, this application did not come to fruition as an available treatment. However, this did not deter Dr. Suresh Srivastava’s interests in continuing to develop the use of the material. Nor did it dissuade Dr. Gilbert Gonzales of Clear Vascular, Inc. from continuing his interactions with Brookhaven. The collaboration between Dr. Srivastava and Dr. Gonzales, which began over a decade ago, has now become a business arrangement in which Clear Vascular, Inc. and Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC. (“BSA”), contractor/operator of Brookhaven National Laboratory, have entered into an Exclusive Field of Use License Agreement for Cardiovascular uses of tin-117m.

The license agreement results from a fruitful interaction between Clear Vascular and Brookhaven National Laboratory under the Initiative for Proliferation Prevention (“IPP”) CRADA program. In 2003 Clear Vascular and BSA executed the IPP CRADA that enabled the team to work in Russia to transfer the production technology for tin-117m from a nuclear reactor method to linear accelerator methods. The new methods create greater quantities and higher specific activity tin-117m than was previously practical. The work resulted in four patents for the production of high specific activity tin-117m using a linear accelerator rather than a nuclear reactor. The increased availability of the tin radionuclide is sufficient to support the production of medically useful materials for treatments of cardiovascular conditions.

Clear Vascular has completed phase two clinical imaging trials and will be starting studies on therapeutic treatment s of heart disease.

Licenses

No Licenses