Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL)

Agency/Department

FLC Region

Security Lab

Yes

Address

Bldg. 460
P.O. Box 5000
Upton, NY 11973-5000
United States

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Laboratory Representative

Description

One of ten national laboratories overseen and primarily funded by the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Brookhaven National Laboratory conducts research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, as well as in energy technologies and national security. Brookhaven Lab also builds and operates major scientific facilities available to university, industry and government researchers. Established in 1947 on Long Island, Upton, N.Y., Brookhaven is a multi- program national laboratory operated by Brookhaven Science Associates for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Six Nobel Prizes have been awarded for discoveries made at the Lab. Brookhaven has a staff of approximately 3,000 scientists, engineers, technicians and support staff and over 4,000 guest researchers annually. Brookhaven National Laboratory's role for the DOE is to produce excellent science and advanced technology with the cooperation, support, and appropriate involvement of our scientific and local communities.

Mission

The fundamental elements of the Laboratory's role in support of the four DOE strategic missions are the following:

  • To conceive, design, construct, and operate complex, leading edge, user-oriented facilities in response to the needs of the DOE and the international community of users.
  • To carry out basic and applied research in long-term, high-risk programs at the frontier of science.
  • To develop advanced technologies that address national needs and to transfer them to other organizations and to the commercial sector.
  • To disseminate technical knowledge, to educate new generations of scientists and engineers, to maintain technical capabilities in the nation's workforce, and to encourage scientific awareness in the general public.

Technology Disciplines

Technologies
Displaying 111 - 120 of 146
 
BSA 14-23: Superhydrophobic Sponges as Efficient Oil and Organic Liquid Absorbents
BSA 14-35: Nanowires and Methods of Making
BSA 14-44: Slits for depth resolution using X-ray diffraction
BSA 15-02: Novel electrode contacts to CdZnTe for X-ray and gamma-ray detector applications
BSA 15-10: Hybrid Design for Improved Cathode Energy Density
BSA 15-20: LASER from Ultrathin Disordered Nanoscale Structures
BSA 15-21: Selective Directed Self Assembly of Coexisting Morphologies Using Block Copolymer Blends for Complex, High Resolution Lithographic Patterning
BSA 15-22: Bioprogrammable Crystallization of Multicomponent Functional Nanoparticle Systems
BSA 16-02 and BSA 16-03: Electrochemically Active Interlayers for Lithium Ion Batteries
BSA 16-04:Nanostructured Copper Vanadium Oxides as High-Capacity Cathodes for Lithium Ion Batteries

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Facilities
Displaying 11 - 20 of 27
Electron Microscopy Facility
Materials Synthesis and Characterization Facility
Nanofabrication Facility
NASA Space Radiation Laboratory
National Nuclear Data Center
National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS)
National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS II)
New York Blue
New York Center for Computational Sciences
Northeast Solar Energy Research Center

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Equipment

No Equipment

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Funds

The Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship (AEF) Program provides a unique opportunity for accomplished K-12 educators in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) to serve in the national education arena. Fellows spend eleven months working in a Federal agency or in a U.S. Congressional office, bringing their extensive knowledge and experience in the classroom to education program and/or education policy efforts.

Current sponsoring agencies include: the Department of Energy (DOE), the National Science Foundation (NSF), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The DOE sponsors up to four placements in congressional offices.

The Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Act was signed into law in November 1994 and gives the DOE the responsibility for managing the program (Fellowship Act Public Law 103-382, Improving America's Schools Act of 1994). The DOE Office of Science's Office of Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists (WDTS) manages this program for DOE in collaboration with the Triangle Coalition for STEM Education and the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE).

Some outstanding contributions of past Einstein Fellows include:

Designing and implementing national science, math, and technology education programs;
Initiating collaborations and partnerships among Federal agencies;
Drafting legislation and advising on policies that seek to improve K-12 education in the United States;
Creating web-based science education tools; and
Establishing and evaluating national and regional programs centered on school reform and teacher preparation in science, mathematics, engineering, and technology.

The workshops, conducted over the course of two days, consist of introductory lectures on synchrotron science, techniques, and operations. Hands-on experimental activities will be offered to participants using a variety of beamlines. Additionally, there will be a writing tutorial focused on the development of competitive beamline proposals for independent research at the NSLS.

The emphasis of this program is to equip students with the necessary tools that assist in the choice of career options, whether it is entering the workforce as a technician, pursuing an undergraduate degree, or both.

This program places students form community colleges in paid internships in Science, Engineering and Technology at BNL. Because of the comprehensive nature of this program, many of the participants have felt it has had an enormous influence on their careers. Students work with scientists or engineers on projects related to the laboratories' research programs. They also attend career planning and numerous training/informational sessions.

The CCI program at BNL will include features which have been the mainstay of our undergraduate programs since 1952.

• Students participate in a Technical Internship, which allows them to participate in one of BNL's ongoing scientific and technical projects.

• Students will participate in cutting-edge research or technology development, directed by a staff member of the BNL scientific community.

• The nature of the internship assignment will be determined after a review by BNL staff of the applicants' background and interests, relevant to the current scientific and technical activities at BNL.

• Students will have the chance to present their scientific or technical results both verbally and in writing, and may appear as a contributor to a scientific journal article or BNL report.

• Students will also participate in Educational Enhancement Activities, offering not only a specific scientific or technical experience, but an in-depth exposure to the scientific enterprise.

• Students will spend approximately 20% of their time in specific group or individual activities designed to promote career development.

The Graduate Research Internship Program (GRIP) intends to pair graduate students with a Brookhaven National Laboratory scientist on a mutually agreed upon project, which will enhance the interns' research skills and may lead to multiple scientific publications and may support their graduate thesis or dissertation. In addition, the GRIP intern will act as a liaison between the university advisor and the BNL scientist in fostering relationships and research opportunities with the two institutions.

After completing all necessary training, students can spend up to three months interning with an assigned BNL researcher and have the option to continue the project during the semesters following, depending upon the requirements by both the researcher and respective college/university. During the semester periods, the candidate will conduct research on scheduled days, which shall notinterrupt their course work at the home institution. The project undertaken may support the student's dissertation or thesis.

Funding:
- Funding for this program will be provided by your home institution.

Program provides:
- Housing, in a single occupancy dorm room
- On-site transportation

Deliverables:
- Research paper, poster for presentation, pre- and post-surveys, and final experience report

The goal of the Office of Science Graduate Student Research (SCGSR) program is to prepare graduate students for science, technology, engineering, or mathematics (STEM) careers critically important to the DOE Office of Science mission, by providing graduate thesis research opportunities at DOE laboratories. The SCGSR program provides supplemental awards to outstanding U.S. graduate students to pursue part of their graduate thesis research at a DOE laboratory in areas that address scientific challenges central to the Office of Science mission. The research opportunity is expected to advance the graduate students' overall doctoral thesis while providing access to the expertise, resources, and capabilities available at the DOE laboratories.

The SCGSR program is sponsored and managed by the DOE Office of Science's Office of Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists (WDTS), in collaboration with the 6 Office of Science research programs and the DOE national laboratories. Online application and awards administration support is provided by Oak Ridge Institute of Science and Education (ORISE) under Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU).

The SCGSR program provides supplemental funds for graduate awardees to conduct part of their thesis research at a host DOE laboratory in collaboration with a DOE laboratory scientist within a defined award period. The award period for the proposed research project at DOE laboratories may range from 3 months to 1 year.

Visiting Faculty Program (VFP) Overview

The Visiting Faculty Program (VFP), formerly called Faculty and Student Teams (FaST), seeks to increase the research competitiveness of faculty members and their students at institutions historically underrepresented in the research community in order to expand the workforce vital to the Department of Energy (DOE) mission areas. As part of the program, selected university/college faculty members collaborate with DOE laboratory research staff on a research project of mutual interest. Faculty member participants may invite up to two students (one of which may be a graduate student) to participate in the research project.

The Visiting Faculty Program is sponsored and managed by the DOE Office of Science's Office of Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists (WDTS) in collaboration with the DOE laboratories.

Applications for the VFP are solicited annually for appointments to the Summer Term (May through August), which is 10 weeks in duration. Each of the 14participating DOE laboratories offer different research opportunities (not all laboratories participate) and interested faculty members are encouraged to contact DOE laboratory scientists in advance to discuss research projects of mutual interest. Student participation is optional.

All VFP faculty applicants must submit at the time of applicationa research project proposal co-developed with the collaborating research staff located at the host DOE laboratory.Proposal guidance and requirements can be found at http://science.energy.gov/wdts/vfp/how-to-apply/developing-a-research-proposal/.

Visiting Faculty Program (VFP) Overview

The Visiting Faculty Program (VFP), formerly called Faculty and Student Teams (FaST), seeks to increase the research competitiveness of faculty members and their students at institutions historically underrepresented in the research community in order to expand the workforce vital to the Department of Energy (DOE) mission areas. As part of the program, selected university/college faculty members collaborate with DOE laboratory research staff on a research project of mutual interest. Faculty member participants may invite up to two students (one of which may be a graduate student) to participate in the research project.

The Visiting Faculty Program is sponsored and managed by the DOE Office of Science's Office of Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists (WDTS) in collaboration with the DOE laboratories.

Applications for the VFP are solicited annually for appointments to the Summer Term (May through August), which is 10 weeks in duration. Each of the 14participating DOE laboratories offer different research opportunities (not all laboratories participate) and interested faculty members are encouraged to contact DOE laboratory scientists in advance to discuss research projects of mutual interest. Student participation is optional.

All VFP faculty applicants must submit at the time of applicationa research project proposal co-developed with the collaborating research staff located at the host DOE laboratory.Proposal guidance and requirements can be found at http://science.energy.gov/wdts/vfp/how-to-apply/developing-a-research-proposal/.

The Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology of the American Chemical Society sponsors and administers the summer schools in nuclear and radiochemistry which are funded by the U.S. Department of Energy. Students participating in the six week summer program at Brookhaven National Laboratory will have the opportunity to visit research sites, attend a guest lecture series, and meet and interact with prominent research scientists working in nuclear and radiochemistry.

The summer school program was founded as an educational outreach activity to promote interest in nuclear science and to provide trained personnel to meet national needs in nuclear research, the nuclear power industry, and nuclear medicine.

The course will present students with critical assessments of the current nonproliferation arrangements. With exercises and demonstrations the course will introduce students to the technologies of international nuclear safeguards and detection of nuclear and other radioactive materials. Above all, the course aims to give participants the knowledge, analytic tools and motivation to contribute to improvement of the nonproliferation regime.

Audience for This Program

Graduate students interested in learning about nuclear nonproliferation

Students spend one week at BNL during the winter break and participate in a lab related research project. Students also interact with Laboratory staff members, attend lectures on current research projects and are guided on tours of the Laboratory facilities to witness scientific projects in progress. Students are expected to participate in a team research experience and present their results at the closing of the college Mini-Semester.

Program Provides
~ Housing: single-occupancy dormitory rooms
~ On-site transportation
~ All Supplies
~ Program will operate from 8:30 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.

Audience for This Program

Full-time sophomore, junior, and senior college, or university students.

Program Benefits

Many of these students return to BNL as part of the Community College Institute (CCI) or the Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship (SULI). Both of these programs offer students the opportunity to become part of a scientific research team for a summer. The SULI program also offers internships during the fall and spring semesters. Students who participate in the College Mini-Semester program are encouraged to apply for the 16-week academic semester programs and for the 10-week summer program

Rules & Eligibility Criteria

A focus on selecting a diverse and talented pool of student interns is given. All students in good standing that meet the eligibility criteria are invited to apply.

  • must be a U.S. citizen or permanent resident alien
  • must have achieved a minimum GPA of 3.0
  • must provide proof of health insurance

Application Process

A completed application consists of:

  1. An application, completed by the student online
  2. A copy of the student's unofficial transcript, then returned to the school's representative
  3. One recommendation from faculty done online
  4. An essay NOT GREATER THAN 400 WORDS explaining why you want to be part of this program and list three areas of research interests including the relevant BNL scientist names performing the research.
  5. BNL Insurance Information, Photo Permission and PRA Form.

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Licenses

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