Ready for Transfer

CDC-AGO, a Targeted Mosquito Trap

Agency: 
Dept. of Health and Human Services

Laboratory: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Technology: Autocidal Gravid Ovitrap Mosquito Trap for Control and Surveillance of Mosquitoes

Opportunity: Available for licensing

Details: Mosquitoes are responsible for the transmission of a number of important zoonotic diseases, including dengue fever, malaria, zika, Rift Valley fever, and West Nile virus. The CDC-AGO (Autocidal Gravid Ovitrap) mosquito trap is a device that targets older female mosquitoes looking for a suitable place to lay eggs. This device is 45 centimeters tall with a 10-liter capacity to hold an attractant, such as water and decaying vegetation. The mosquitoes are captured by a nontoxic adhesive, and eggs are collected on a hydrogel. The use of the hydrogel instead of a liquid prevents the larvae from hatched mosquito eggs from completing development.

Benefits: Over time, insecticide compounds degrade and mosquito populations can become insecticide-resistant, so many chemical ovitraps currently on the market are short-lived. Unlike other mosquito control methods, the CDC-AGO addresses this need with its use of nontoxic adhesive and hydrogel polymer instead of insecticide.

Potential Applications:

  • Device for mosquito control
  • May be useful in regions of the world affected by vector-borne zoonotic diseases

 

Contact: For more information about this award-winning technology, contact TTO@cdc.gov  or Lisa Marianni, RN, MBA at lmarianni@cdc.gov

View the original listing for this technology from the National Institutes of Health’s Office of Technology Transfer, which administers the CDC’s technology transfer program.

Region: 
Southeast